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Thursday, January 31, 2019

Joseph Mayo on Aiming the Clubface, Part 2 (Video)

As promised in yesterday's post, today we look at what causes the two most common "bad" hooks.  First, just like yesterday, I'm posting instructor Joseph Mayo's video on how to aim your club so the ball goes where you want it to go.



And also as I posted yesterday, here's the gist of Joe's basics:
  • The ball starts out in the same direction the clubface is pointed.
  • Then the ball curves in the opposite direction of the clubhead's path.
That's simple enough, although it can be a challenge at first to imagine how it works in your swing. So here's the explanation for the "bad" hooks.

First, here's the standard push hook. Imagine there's an aimline running from your ball straight to your target:
  • For a right-hander, the ball starts out to the right of your aimline and then curves back to the left, toward the aimline. That means your clubface is pointed to the right of your target when it contacts the ball, and the path of the clubhead is even farther to the rightt. Remember, the ball curves in the OPPOSITE direction of the clubhead's path.
  • For a left-hander, the ball starts out to the left of your aimline and then curves back to the right, toward the aimline. That means your clubface is pointed to the left of your target when it contacts the ball, and the path of the clubhead is even farther to the left. Remember, the ball curves in the OPPOSITE direction of the clubhead's path.
In both cases, the ball is pushed to the opposite side of the aimline that you're standing on -- the "far" side.

Then there's the pull hook, aka the "duck hook":
  • For a right-hander, the ball starts out to the left of your aimline and then curves even farther to the left. That means your clubface is pointed to the left of your target when it contacts the ball, and the path of the clubhead is left of your aimline but still right of where the clubface is aimed.
  • For a left-hander, the ball starts out to the right of your aimline and then curves even farther to the right. That means your clubface is pointed to the right of your target when it contacts the ball, and the path of the clubhead is right of your aimline but still left of where the clubface is aimed.
In both cases, the ball is pulled to the same side of the aimline that you're standing on -- the "near" side.

And the difference here is that the push hook may get somewhere near the hole but the pull hook will end up out in the boonies somewhere.

As with yesterday, I'm suggesting a drill you can do indoors -- just put a ball down and practice moving the club from about a foot behind the ball to a foot in front of the ball. Don't swing the club, just move it so you can push the ball a few feet along the floor. It's not that the ball will necessarily make the shot shape; I just think it will be easier to imagine the face angle and path direction with a ball to help you aim.

You might even want to lay a yardstick down to show your aimline. If you do, when you try the pull hook angles, the clubhead should finish on the same side of the yardstick that you're standing on. And when you try the push hook angles, the clubhead should finish on the opposite side of the yardstick that you're standing on.

Getting these angles straight in your mind is absolutely necessary if you want to get that hook in play..

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