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Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Putting on TifDwarf Greens

The greens at Waialae Country Club are planted in TifDwarf grass, a version of Bermuda. So I thought I'd see if there are any putting tips specific to that kind of grass.

TifDwarf grass

First off, TifDwarf Bermudagrass isn't a new type of grass. It was actually released for use all the way back in 1965 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, according to newlifeturf.com. But it's certainly become very popular because it's heat-resistant and very durable for commercial purposes.

In fact, I found a post at coastalgolfaway.com that says:

Tifdwarf Bermudagrass offers a fine blade and its putting surface can be compared to that of Bentgrass greens. It is very adaptable to heat, brackish soils, heavy traffic and low mowing. Because of its over seeding and transitions characteristics, it is highly effective for year-round play in areas where summer temperatures reach and exceed 100 degrees. Tifdwarf has smaller and shorter leaves, stems and internodes and the leaf blades are dark green in color and have the finest texture of the hybrid Bermuda grasses.

That may be more than you need to know, but the important thing for us now is that it plays very much like Bentgrass. So what can we learn from that?

I found another post, this one on wojdylogolf.com, that points out the main difference between Bermuda and Bentgrass -- namely, that grain is most important for putting Bermuda while slope is most important for putting Bentgrass.

The finer texture of TifDwarf has less grain and provides a smoother, faster roll, so it will mimic Bentgrass in that way.

So if you're putting on TifDwarf Bermuda greens, you should realize that the slope of the green will have a much greater effect on the break than grain will, and the putts will probably roll a bit farther and faster as well.

Hopefully that knowledge will save you a few strokes on the green.

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